Wimberley, Texas: The Town with the Big Boots

 

If you like the sights I showed you of Gruene, Texas, you may want to drive over to another small town called Wimberley. This town was started as a trading post settlement in 1848 near Cypress Creek. William C. Winters built a gristmill on the site and the settlement was called Winters Mill. In 1874 Pleasant Wimberley bought the mill and over the years it produced lumber, shingles, flour, molasses and cotton.

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Winters-Wimberley House–Wikipedia.com

The first thing we saw as we headed into town was a large colorful boot next to a shop. As we located a place to park we saw several more. In fact there are 50 boots all over this little town

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birdboot

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Need some bling?

If you want to see all the shops open (in winter) you should come Thursday-Sunday. We went to town on Wednesday and we missed out on a few interesting ones.

Here are a few of the shops:

  • Papa Hoo’s Popcorn—gourmet-popping corn.
  • Wimberley Café
  • Kiss the Cook—any kitchen utensil you will ever need
  • The Art Gallery
  • Billie Lorraine Jewelry store
  • Aunt Jenny’s Attic
  • 4 Sister Shop
  • Pitzer’s Fine Arts—these sculptures will make you smile
  • Under One Roof
  • The Old Mill Store—beautiful woodworking
  • The Wild West Store, home of the “boot whisperer”
  • The Farmloft
  • Wall Street Western—the coolest shop ever!

The Chickadee shop was full of all sorts of vintage items, including a doll I remember from my younger years. When you flip up her apron, you read the story.

 

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There are plenty of antique stores in these little towns, some may be familiar, but I’m sure you won’t find as many used-in-good-condition cowboy boots as you can in Texas!

We had a fine lunch out on the patio in front of the Wimberley Café. The lunch special for $6.99 was 2 slender pork chops with wild rice and copper penny carrots, along with plain iced tea. This was served along with Southern hospitality!

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I want to share a few photos of the shops I enjoyed the most:

The Old Mill Store

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Pitzer’s Fine Art

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My favorite shop–saving the best for last…Wall Street Western

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The outfit hanging on the left was custom-made for Marty Robbins. See the boots to the right.

 

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This jacket was made for me!
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Also made for me! The leather was so soft…

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All items are well displayed and guarded by 4 Persian cats.
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This fine display of old hats greets you when you come in the door.
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And the boots!

 

 

One thing we have discovered–in Texas you can’t find an ice cream stand that sells hard or soft ice cream in a cone…or dish. What you find are popsicles, and other things on a stick, in the grocery store. You can also find (what used to be ½ gallons) of ice cream there. Why is this, I ask? Because it’s too hot in summer?

We settled for DQ and had blizzards…not quite the same, but it was a hot day in winter.

 

Next time…The Alamo

 

 

 

 

 

New Perspectives

On December 26th, the Umpire and I headed, by car, on our first winter vacation…ever. It is one thing to fly to a far away place, and another to enjoy the ride, which at any point may become tediously long. Then again, if you have never been that way before, you have the luxury of seeing new lands for the first time.

If you have family members (that still love you!) you may call ahead and ask if they’d like to keep you overnight on the way to your destination. I have never been, ‘on my way to Texas’ before and had never been past Ohio going south. Even though we could have traveled further the first day, we wanted to spend a lengthy afternoon and overnight with family. Loved those homemade meatballs and family love!

Our first stop was Cuyahoga Valley National Park where we took a 1.5 mile hike to ‘get the day started’.

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We barely hit the Kentucky line when we stopped for a long afternoon and evening at the Creation Museum in Petersburg. There we picked up 2 tickets for the museum and the Ark Encounter for the next day.

Already familiar with Ken Ham and Answers in Genesis, we saw comparisons between the world/human view of the earth and the Biblical/historical view.

Before I post a few pictures, I am happy to say we were very impressed with the professionalism in which this museum was designed. Everything was top-notch, from facts to floor plans, from animal sculptures, to human sculptures, (even the movable ones). It gives me a sense of pride that some believers use their God given abilities to present to the world a museum well worth seeing.

We enjoyed a Christmas concert in the evening with three sisters,who sang and  played various instruments. As we left in the dark, we walked the well-groomed yards with trees full of Christmas lights.

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This guy was moving!

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Check out the website here: https://creationmuseum.org

We took a bus from the Ark center the next morning. We could see the Ark on the top of the hill from there. It was an impressive sight!

See the website here: Ark encounter.

If you’ve ever read Genesis, you know that God gave Noah the EXACT measurements for the building of the ark. At the ark you may watch a fast forward video on the building of the model ark, but I found it more educational to go through the ark, floor by floor and skip the actual building video. Once again we were impressed and spent several hours viewing the animal cages, clay bottles and troughs for watering the animals. The storage areas for food, tools, seed, hay, were placed along the walls in open cupboards. Artistic license was used on the family living quarters. The enormity of the ark certainly left an image in my mind.

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See the people in the background close to the ark.
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Small cages with clay water jugs

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Mural of universal flood

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Family area

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The dove comes back to Noah with an olive branch.

Later we headed south on Rt. 31 through the rolling hills, horse farms, and creeks, when we came upon an old cabin. The site was at Knob Creek; the homestead where Abraham Lincoln grew up.

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Shortly on down the road was the National Parks Service memorial site at Sinking Springs; Lincoln’s birthplace.

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Horses and more horses!

Kentucky is full of rolling hills, horses, and beef cows. We enjoyed the country drive when we arrived at our next destination— more family! We spent another easy evening catching up with relatives, enjoying the ability to grill steaks outdoors in December. There we set up a tour for the Mammoth Caves for the next day.

 

Stay tuned for more…