Remember the Alamo!

Today I see snow falling out of my window as I write more about Texas. We are home, and as we sift through our month of mail and read last year’s late Christmas cards we feel as if we have fallen into the Matrix. First of all, I am not warm yet! But I’ve always enjoyed the snow. Shoveling—not so much anymore.

Our daughter came along with us the day we went to San Antonio. We headed to The Pearl, near the upper end of the River Walk. The 15 miles of River Walk are part of the San Antonio watershed. The San Antonio River flows 240 miles through 5 counties and converges with the Guadalupe River before it flows into San Antonio Bay on the Gulf of Mexico.

First—we went to Local Coffee for lattes. Merit coffee is …mmm…and the atmosphere!

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Some of the shops around the Pearl are high-end, but it was worth taking a look. The Tiny Finch, Bakery Lorraine, Ten Thousand Villages, and The Twig Book Shop are some shops we stepped inside. Of course, the bakery had cinnamon rolls, which the Umpire couldn’t seem to resist.

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Culinary Institute of America

 

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This building once was the stable for Hotel Emma.

 

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Hotel Emma

 

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Walk through areas in the hotel.

 

River Walk photos:

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The Alamo

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The Umpire and me.

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At the Alamo there are rules of reverence:

Please remove hats inside Church, no photography in the buildings, do not touch the walls or lean on display cases, no obscene or offensive clothing, and a few others I didn’t mention.

On the grounds is a courtyard with historical artifacts and a short movie on the events leading to the fight at the Alamo and what happened afterward.

On Feb. 23, 1836, General Antonio Lopez Santa Anna and his army arrived in front of the Alamo. In the Alamo there were nearly 200 volunteers by the time they were eight days into the siege, but Santa Anna’s army was too great. The final assault came before daybreak on March 6, 1836, thirteen days into the siege.

Exactly what happened at the Alamo is still debated, but there is no doubt what this battle has come to symbolize for people all over the world. We remember the Alamo as a heroic struggle against overwhelming odds. This is where men laid down their lives for freedom.

 

 

Next up is Fredericksburg and the Enchanted Rock…

 

 

 

Wimberley, Texas: The Town with the Big Boots

 

If you like the sights I showed you of Gruene, Texas, you may want to drive over to another small town called Wimberley. This town was started as a trading post settlement in 1848 near Cypress Creek. William C. Winters built a gristmill on the site and the settlement was called Winters Mill. In 1874 Pleasant Wimberley bought the mill and over the years it produced lumber, shingles, flour, molasses and cotton.

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Winters-Wimberley House–Wikipedia.com

The first thing we saw as we headed into town was a large colorful boot next to a shop. As we located a place to park we saw several more. In fact there are 50 boots all over this little town

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birdboot

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Need some bling?

If you want to see all the shops open (in winter) you should come Thursday-Sunday. We went to town on Wednesday and we missed out on a few interesting ones.

Here are a few of the shops:

  • Papa Hoo’s Popcorn—gourmet-popping corn.
  • Wimberley Café
  • Kiss the Cook—any kitchen utensil you will ever need
  • The Art Gallery
  • Billie Lorraine Jewelry store
  • Aunt Jenny’s Attic
  • 4 Sister Shop
  • Pitzer’s Fine Arts—these sculptures will make you smile
  • Under One Roof
  • The Old Mill Store—beautiful woodworking
  • The Wild West Store, home of the “boot whisperer”
  • The Farmloft
  • Wall Street Western—the coolest shop ever!

The Chickadee shop was full of all sorts of vintage items, including a doll I remember from my younger years. When you flip up her apron, you read the story.

 

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There are plenty of antique stores in these little towns, some may be familiar, but I’m sure you won’t find as many used-in-good-condition cowboy boots as you can in Texas!

We had a fine lunch out on the patio in front of the Wimberley Café. The lunch special for $6.99 was 2 slender pork chops with wild rice and copper penny carrots, along with plain iced tea. This was served along with Southern hospitality!

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I want to share a few photos of the shops I enjoyed the most:

The Old Mill Store

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Pitzer’s Fine Art

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My favorite shop–saving the best for last…Wall Street Western

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The outfit hanging on the left was custom-made for Marty Robbins. See the boots to the right.

 

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This jacket was made for me!
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Also made for me! The leather was so soft…

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All items are well displayed and guarded by 4 Persian cats.
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This fine display of old hats greets you when you come in the door.
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And the boots!

 

 

One thing we have discovered–in Texas you can’t find an ice cream stand that sells hard or soft ice cream in a cone…or dish. What you find are popsicles, and other things on a stick, in the grocery store. You can also find (what used to be ½ gallons) of ice cream there. Why is this, I ask? Because it’s too hot in summer?

We settled for DQ and had blizzards…not quite the same, but it was a hot day in winter.

 

Next time…The Alamo